Last edited by Darisar
Friday, May 8, 2020 | History

4 edition of Improving Patient Adherence in Clinical Practice found in the catalog.

Improving Patient Adherence in Clinical Practice

Peter Barnett

Improving Patient Adherence in Clinical Practice

A Practical Guide

by Peter Barnett

  • 121 Want to read
  • 15 Currently reading

Published by Aspen Publishers .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Reference,
  • Clinical Chemistry,
  • Physician & Patient,
  • Physician-Patient Interaction,
  • Medical / Nursing,
  • Medical

  • The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages350
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL11489625M
    ISBN 100834211076
    ISBN 109780834211070
    OCLC/WorldCa228382285

    Clinical cases will be used to illustrate best practices for initiating insulin therapies, managing patients who exhibit psychological insulin resistance, improving adherence, and overcoming clinical inertia. Improving patient adherence: a three-factor model to guide practice M. Robin DiMatteoa, Kelly B. Haskard-Zolnierekb and Leslie R. Martinc* aDepartment of Psychology, University of California, Riverside, CA, USA; bDepartment of Psychology, Texas State University, San Marcos, TX, USA; cDepartment of Psychology, La Sierra University, Riverwalk Pkwy, Riverside, CA , USA.

      Improving Adherence to Therapy and Clinical Outcomes While Containing Costs: Opportunities From the Greater Use of Generic Medications: Best Practice Advice From the Clinical Guidelines Committee of the American College of Physicians Free Niteesh K. Choudhry, MD, PhD; Thomas D. Denberg, MD, PhD; Amir Qaseem, MD, PhD, MHA,; for the Clinical Guidelines Committee Cited by: ers. Adding patient-reported outcomes (PROs) and data to routine clinical care requires substantial planning, logistics, and adjustment in care delivery practices. Technology now permits electronic capture of patient-reported symptoms, functioning, and quality of life, but adoption into routine care is slow.

      Investigators conducting clinical trials need to appreciate the important role of adherence in clinical research. Poor compliance may reduce the power of a study and lead to an underestimation of the efficacy of a treatment and dismissal of a potentially useful therapeutic agent. In general, medication adherence of participants in clinical trials is better than in clinical by: Costs of Poor Medication Adherence • Not taking medications as prescribed costs over $ billion a year in excess hospitalizations.7 • Total annual health care spending for a diabetes patient with low medication adherence ($16,) is almost twice the amount for a patient with high adherence ($8,).8File Size: KB.


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Improving Patient Adherence in Clinical Practice by Peter Barnett Download PDF EPUB FB2

Factors Related to Adherence. To improve patient adherence, it is important to understand why nonadherence occurs. A substantial literature has documented a number of factors related to diabetes regimen adherence problems.

12 It is helpful to consider demographic, psychological, and social factors, as well as health care provider, medical system, and disease- and treatment-related by: Improving patient adherence. The first step toward improving patient adherence involves accurately assessing whether or not patients have followed the treatments recommended to them.

The precise estimation of patient adherence is not easy, and a full understanding of whether and why any given patient chooses and is able to adhere is often by: Lequerica et al. [43] 35 Adherence to long-term therapies: Evidence for action (Book) Sabaté [11] 36 Improving patient treatment adherence: A clinician's guide (Book) Bosworth [44] participatory Author: Hayden Bosworth.

Improving Patient Treatment Adherence Across Multiple Behaviors: A Clinician's Guide differs significantly from many treatment adherence books on the market by focusing on clinicians and the practical tactics they need to improve patient adherence.

The book is orgnaized by behavior and special issues as opposed to other texts, which look at Price: $ This book is organized by behaviors―looking at topics that range from dietary adherence and smoking cessation to chronic pain, HIV and substance abuse―and examines the impact of patient non-adherence, including costs, clinical outcomes, and health-related quality of : Paperback.

Introduction. The problem of poor adherence to medical treatment is a well-recognized problem in the literature.[1–4] Studies have shown that in the United States alone, nonadherence to medications causesdeaths annually and accounts for 10% to 25% of hospital and nursing home admissions.

This makes nonadherence to medications one of the largest and most expensive disease Cited by: In order to improve patient adherence, we must recognize the risk factors for nonadherence. These can be divided into patient-centered issues, situational issues, medication regimen-related issues.

Adherence to Clinical Practice Guidelines during Antenatal Management of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: An Integrative Review. Nisreen I. Salama, Lubna Abushaikha.

DOI: /ojn Downloads Views. Pub. Factors affecting patient adherence include patient beliefs and demographics, protocol costs, lack of patient education, and comorbidities. Nonadherence to treatment plans can negatively impact outcomes, increase office visits, and contribute to higher or unnecessary healthcare costs.

This book is organized by behaviors—looking at topics that range from dietary adherence and smoking cessation to chronic pain, HIV and substance abuse—and examines the impact of patient non-adherence, including costs, clinical outcomes, and health-related quality of life.

Improving Patient Adherence. Improving patient survival and quality of life in chronic diseases requires prolonged and often lifelong medication intake. implications for clinical practice Author: Alan Delamater.

Poorly controlled symptoms are common and debilitating during cancer treatment and can affect functional status and quality of life, health care resource utilization, treatment adherence, and cancer survivorship.

Historically, the patient experience, including symptoms during treatment, has not been tracked or documented in the patient health record. Measurement of patient-reported outcomes Cited by: 7. Introduction Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) are designed to reduce inappropriate clinical variation and improve the quality of care.

Barriers to CPGs include a lack of awareness of CPGs, access to them, time pressures and concerns regarding the evidence underpinning CPG development, implementation and dissemination. The objectives of this study are to assess clinicians’ attitudes to.

Objective To identify features of clinical decision support systems critical for improving clinical practice. Design Systematic review of randomised controlled trials. Data sources Literature searches via Medline, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register up to ; and searches of reference lists of included studies and relevant by:   Improving Patient Treatment Adherence Across Multiple Behaviors: A Clinician's Guide differs significantly from many treatment adherence books on the market by focusing on clinicians and the practical tactics they need to improve patient adherence.

The book is orgnaized by behavior and special issues as opposed to other texts, which look at Brand: Springer New York. In Brief Improved health outcomes for individuals with diabetes depend on integrating self-management into daily life.

A wide variety of educational, behavioral, and affective interventions are available that individually produce modest improvements in patient adherence to treatment recommendations in diabetes and related chronic illnesses and that work somewhat better when used Cited by:   Guidelines are integral to reducing variation in paediatric care by ensuring that children receive the right care, every time.

However, for reasons discussed in this paper, clinicians do not always follow evidence-based guidelines. Strategies to improve guideline usage tend to focus on dissemination and education. These approaches, however, do not address some of the more complex factors that Cited by: 4.

Most medication challenges are unique to the individual patient preferences. As such, providers need to use unique strategies to help patients. Clinicians should start by identifying the patient’s challenge, and then work to overcome it. This will ideally result in better medication adherence and stronger overall patient wellness.

That’s why Merck developed the Adherence Estimator—a 3-question survey that may help health care providers to better counsel their patients on taking oral medications for certain chronic conditions. The Adherence Estimator has been validated for newly prescribed oral medications for chronic asymptomatic conditions (eg, high cholesterol).

Patient outcomes are directly impacted by the level of adherence. It is the goal of this eBook to provide not only a greater understanding of patient adherence, but to also provide actionable opportunities for use within your practice. With these systems, patients can book appointments, request medication refills from the pharmacy, be reminded to take medications, and track their intake of food.

15 It could also answer questions about a patient’s condition, symptoms, and medications, and be used to call for help in emergency situations.Improving Patient Outcomes: A Case Study in Adherence in Diabetes Nathaniel M.

Rickles, PharmD, PhD, BCPP Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice & Administration Northeastern University School of Pharmacy Boston, MA Objectives • Identify patient barriers to medication adherence.

• Describe the clinical and economic impact of. Improving Patient Adherence: Practical Strategies for Improving Secondary Prevention is to enhance healthcare professionals' knowledge and skills for improving patient and clinician adherence to secondary prevention guidelines following myocardial infarction.

an acute MI standard order set, a clinical pathway, a pocket card, a patient.