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Saturday, May 9, 2020 | History

8 edition of Press censorship in Jacobean England found in the catalog.

Press censorship in Jacobean England

by Cyndia Susan Clegg

  • 379 Want to read
  • 39 Currently reading

Published by Cambridge University Press in Cambridge, U.K, New York .
Written in English

    Places:
  • England
    • Subjects:
    • Freedom of the press -- England -- History -- 16th century.,
    • Freedom of the press -- England -- History -- 17th century.,
    • Press -- England -- History -- 16th century.,
    • Press -- England -- History -- 17th century.,
    • Censorship -- England -- History -- 16th century.,
    • Censorship -- England -- History -- 17th century.

    • Edition Notes

      Includes biblioraphical references (p. 269-276) and index.

      StatementCyndia Susan Clegg.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsPN4748.G7 C487 2001
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxi, 286 p. ;
      Number of Pages286
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL3943706M
      ISBN 100521782430
      LC Control Number2001025218

      Prosperous Regiment of Blessed Queene Elisabeth (), Press Censorship in Jacobean England () and Press Censorship in Elizabethan England (), both published by Cambridge University Press. She has published widely on the subjects of Renaissance literature . This is a revisionist history of press censorship in the rapidly expanding print culture of the sixteenth century. Professor Clegg establishes the nature and source of the controls, and evaluates their means and effectiveness. The state wanted to control the burgeoning press, but there were difficulties in practice because of the competing and often contradictory interests of the Crown, the.

      Press Censorship in Jacobean England. Cyndia Susan Clegg Press Censorship in Jacobean England Cyndia Susan Clegg This book examines the ways in which books were produced, read, and received during the reign of King.   Clegg systematically breaks down Jacobean press censorship into its constituent parts, exploring the diverse ways in which censorship could be exercised, the different institutions that administered it, and the people whose individual biases and beliefs shaped its application.

        Following her two previous studies of press censorship in Elizabethan and Jacobean England, Cyndia Clegg takes the story through the next volatile period. She explores the distinctive culture of censorship that emerged between and , and ultimately led the Long Parliament to impose drastic changes in press : Cyndia Susan Clegg. The history of censorship in England has been well covered by , whose book Freedom of the Press in England, – The Rise and Decline of Government Controls is regarded to be a contributive work to the study of book history and is often cited by other scholars. This book with the works of Cyndiasan Clegg and John Feather are.


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Press censorship in Jacobean England by Cyndia Susan Clegg Download PDF EPUB FB2

It challenges prevailing attitudes that press censorship in Jacobean England differed little from either the 'whole machinery of control' enacted by the Court of Star Chamber under Elizabeth or the draconian campaign implemented by Archbishop Laud, during the reign of Charles I.

Cyndia Clegg, building on her earlier study Press Censorship in Elizabethan England, contends that although the principal mechanisms for controlling the press Manufacturer: Cambridge University Press.

It challenges prevailing attitudes that press censorship in Jacobean England differed little from either the 'whole machinery of control' enacted by the Court of Star Chamber Press censorship in Jacobean England book Elizabeth or the draconian campaign implemented by Archbishop Laud, during the reign of Charles I.

Cyndia Clegg, building on her earlier study Press Censorship in Elizabethan England, contends that although the principal mechanisms for controlling the press.

This book examines the ways in which books were produced, read, and received during the reign of King James I. Cyndia Clegg contends that although the principal mechanisms for controlling the press altered little between andthe actual practice of censorship under James I varied significantly from Elizabethan by: "Press Censorship in Jacobean England examines the ways in which books were produced, read, and received during the reign of King James I.

Press censorship is an issue of perennial interest for early modern scholars, and has been the focal point for profound historiographical and ideological debates relating to the power of the state, the degree of division within society, and the causes of civil wars.

Introduction - Jacobean Press Censorship and the “unsatisfying Impasse” in the Historiography of Stuart England 1 Chapter 1 - Authority, License, and Law: the Theory and Practice of Censorship   This book examines the ways in which books were produced, read and received during the reign of King James I.

It challenges prevailing attitudes that press censorship in Jacobean England differed little from either the 'whole machinery of control' enacted by the Court of Star Chamber under Elizabeth or the draconian campaign implemented by Archbishop Laud, during the reign of 3/5(1). 'Press Censorship in Jacobean England is a valuable addition to the revisionist history of the Jacobean age, as well as to our understanding of the practice and mechanisms of early modern censorship.' The Times Literary Supplement.

'Press Censorship in Jacobean England is a valuable addition to the revisionist history of the Jacobean age, as well as to our understanding of the practice and mechanisms of early modern censorship.' The Times Literary SupplementAuthor: Cyndia Susan Clegg.

Press Censorship in Jacobean England Clegg, Cyndia Susan: Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp., Publication Date: November Stanford Lehmberg University of Minnesota, Author: Stanford Lehmberg.

Building on her two previous studies on press censorship in Elizabethan and Jacobean England, Cyndia Clegg scrutinizes all aspects of Caroline print culture: book production in London, the universities, and on the Continent; licensing and authorization practices in both the Stationers' Company and among the ecclesiastical licensers; cases before the courts of High Commission and Star Chamber and the.

De Gelder, Katrien. “Press Censorship in Jacobean England.” ENGLISH STUDIES: A JOURNAL OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE – Print. Following her books on press censorship in Elizabethan and Jacobean England, Cyndia Susan Clegg has now engaged with the historiographically more controversial subject of control of the press under Charles : Anna Bayman.

Content in Canadian Journal of History published by @utpjournals. Press Censorship in Jacobean England. By Cyndia Susan Clegg (New York, Cambridge University Press, ) pp.

$ By Cyndia Susan Clegg (New York, Cambridge University Press, ) pp. $Author: Alastair James Bellany. Book description This is a revisionist history of press censorship in the rapidly expanding print culture of the sixteenth century. Professor Clegg establishes the nature and source of the controls, and evaluates their means and effectiveness.

This book examines the ways in which books were produced, read, and received during the reign of King James I. Cyndia Clegg contends that although the principal mechanisms for controlling the press altered little between andthe actual practice of censorship under James I varied Price: $ Press Censorship in Jacobean England Article in Albion A Quarterly Journal Concerned with British Studies 35(1) October with 9 Reads How we measure 'reads'.

It hardly seems worth noting that aside from identifying its period, the title of this new book, Press Censorship in Jacobean England, contains neither adjectives nor a subtitle to offer a general assessment of the practice.

This is entirely appropriate for a study which eschews simplification. Between anda distinctive cultural awareness of censorship emerged, which ultimately led the Long Parliament to impose drastic changes in press control. The culture of censorship addressed in this study helps to explain the divergent historical interpretations of Caroline censorship as either draconian or benign.

Such contradictions transpire because the Caroline regime and its. It focused on censorship in the realm of theater, which might seem limited in the context of things that could be censored, but it did a good job of explaining that Elizabethan and Jacobean drama was the main vestige of Elizabethan and Jacobean literature and a.

Public book burning was the most dramatic method of post-publication censorship in early modern England. As an aspect of legislation designed to regulate the press it worked in concert with Parliamentary efforts to suppress religious dissent.

Together these measures created a climate in certain circles conducive to self-censorship.Richard Dutton was born in Northwich, Cheshire, in England, and was educated there at Sir John Deane's Grammar School.

From tohe was a tutor at Wroxton College, in Banbury, the British campus of the Fairleigh Dickinson University of New Jersey.